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The Scissors Coup

North opened 1. He cashes the A and switches to a small club. How should West play to make 4?

A6
AQJT94
A
T642
KJT875
KJ954
87
Q9
K853
QT82
A53
432
762
763
KQJ9
After the club switch, declarer has three losers : a spade, a diamond and a club. To make his contract, he must avoid the impending ruff by North. He must therefore win the A at trick 2 and immediately lead the K to discard his losing club. North wins but is unable to reach South for a diamond ruff.

How to train your Snapdragon

In bridge bidding, a Snapdragon double is a competitive double after the first three players bid three different suits. A Snapdragon double by the fourth player is artificial and forcing. It advertises length in the lone unbid suit (5+ cards), at least 8 points, and tolerance for partner's suit. "Tolerance" ranges from doubleton to tripleton support depending on partnership agreement.
 

The Immaculate Assumption

On this deal, East did not want to go quietly and in typical duplicate fashion, pushed the opponents to the five-level. West cashed the Ace-King of clubs and without paying much attention to East's carding, made the obvious logical switch to a spade, for a one-trick set. Could or should West defend better?

K8
T96542
AQ
JT7
Q62
7
T52
AK9853
AT953
K
J98743
Q
J74
AQJ83
K6
642
SouthWestNorthEast
1Pass44
PassPass5Pass
PassPass
The answer is YES. East is captain of the defence since he knows whether or not he can ruff a club. East-West were playing Standard discards.

Standing in Another Man's Grave

Auctions are often spirited affairs where both sides overvalue their assets.

North/South Vulnerable, West Dealer.

AQ53
QJ852
AQ62
K
AK3
KJ753
KT82
Q9762
97
T94
973
JT4
T64
AQ862
J5
SouthWestNorthEast
-11Pass
233Pass
4PassPassPass

The first round of bidding was normal. When West decided to bid 3 he had dug a three-foot deep trench that would spell his demise. He knew he had the best hand at the table and refused to be shut out. On the bidding, East could hardly hold very much in terms of high card points.

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